June, 2021

Elinor Ostrom and the Bloomington School

Building a New Approach to Policy and the Social Sciences
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Elinor Ostrom was the first female winner of the Nobel Prize in economics, and her achievement has generated renewed interest in the Bloomington School research program in institutional economics and political economy. These essays showcase Ostrom's extensive and lasting influence throughout economics and the wider social sciences. Contributors contextualize the Bloomington School within schools of economic thought and show how Ostrom's distinct methodology has been used in policy-making and governance. Case studies illustrate the value of civic involvement within public policy, a method pioneered by Ostrom and the Bloomington School. Elinor Ostrom and the Bloomington School provides a valuable resource for those keen to understand Ostrom's approach, especially when applied to policy-making and wider use in the social sciences. Readers new to the Bloomington School will be introduced to its central areas of research while those already familiar with the school will appreciate its subtle connections to other disciplines and research agendas.

 

Table of Contents:

Introduction: the Bloomington School in context
Jayme Lemke and Vlad Tarko

Public choice theory: reuniting Virginia and Bloomington
Emil Duhnea and Adam Martin

New institutional economics: building from shared foundations
Michael D. McGinnis

Elinor Ostrom as a behavioural economist
Vlad Tarko

New economic sociology and the Ostroms: a combined approach
Alice Calder and Virgil Henry Storr

Foundations of social order: the Ostroms and John Searle
Adrian Miroiu and Adelin Dumitru

Environmental policy from a self-governance perspective
Jayme Lemke and Jordan K. Lofthouse

Learning from the socialist calculation debate: is efficiency in public economics possible?
Peter J. Boettke

Public administration from "intellectual crisis" to "contemporary "governance theory"
Paul Dragos Aligica

Rethinking federalism: social order through evolution or design?
Rosolino A. Candela