September 7, 2007

The Political, Economic, and Social Aspects of Katrina

  • Emily Chamlee-Wright

    Senior Affiliated Scholar
  • Peter J. Boettke

    Director, F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics
  • Peter Gordon

    Mercatus Center Affiliated Senior Scholar
  • Peter Leeson

    Senior Fellow, F. A. Hayek Program for Advanced Study in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics
  • Sanford Ikeda

    Associate Professor of Economics, SUNY Purchase
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This paper examines the resiliency of community recovery following natural disaster. We argue that a resilient recovery requires robust economic/financial institutions, political/legal institutions, and social/cultural institutions. We explore how politically and privately created disaster preconditions and responses have contributed to or undermined institutional robustness in the context of the Gulf Coast’s recovery following Hurricane Katrina. We find that where post-disaster resiliency has been observed, private-sector responses contributing to the health these institutional arenas are largely responsible. Where post-disaster fragility and slowness has been observed, public-sector responses contributing to the frailty of these institutional arenas are largely the cause.  In other words, we engage in a comparative institutional analysis of civil society, entrepreneurial commercial society, and government agencies and political actors in the wake of a natural disaster.

Find the article at SSRN.

Peter Boettke, Emily Chamlee-Wright, Peter Gordon, Sanford Ikeda, Peter T. Leeson, and Russell Sobel. "The Political, Economic, and Social Aspects of Katrina," Southern Economic Journal, Vol. 74, No. 2, 2007