The Future of Work

A Conference in Partnership with the Niskanen Center
Summary

This two-day conference, in partnership with the Niskanen Center, aims to explore the role of markets, civil society, and government in shaping the future of work and technology.


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS

Michael C. Munger

Professor of Political Science, Economics, and Public Policy, Duke University

Elizabeth Rhodes
Research Director for the Basic Income Project, Y Combinator Research

Betsey Stevenson
Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics, University of Michigan

Glen Weyl
Principal Researcher, Microsoft Research

Oct 11, 2019Oct 12, 2019
Arlington, VA
United States
Add to Calendar:

Call for abstract submissions due June 1, 2019.

Registration will open in summer 2019.

Technological innovation is a driving factor of economic growth, that both disrupts current practices and creates new opportunities. For instance, it changes the structure, nature, and meaning of work in both positive ways (such as productivity gains, the development of remote work, etc.) and in more disruptive ways (such as how automation can lead to job loss, economy-wide shifts in industries and skills, etc.). As a society, we tend to both yearn for and caution against technological change and economists, policymakers, and the general public have an interest in how technology will impact our society.

This two-day conference, in partnership with the Niskanen Center, aims to explore the role of markets, civil society, and government in shaping the future of work and technology. It will include keynote speakers on the big themes on the future of work and paper presentations by students, scholars and analysts working on new research in this area.

Call for Abstract Submissions
Deadline: June 1, 2019

We invite students and scholars to submit abstracts on role of markets, civil society, and government in shaping the future of work and technology. Some suggested topics are:

  • The impact of technological change on the structure, nature, and meaning of work
  • Implications of a changing leisure-work balance on the culture and meaning of work
  • How technology (such as AI advancements) can improve the assessment and distribution of welfare services
  • Perspectives on and implications of futurism and forecasting

To submit, please provide a 200 word abstract to academics@mercatus.gmu.edu by June 1, 2019. Include your full name, affiliation, and preferred email address along with your abstract. If you have co-authors, please include their information as well. Selections will be announced in the summer of 2019.

The conference will also be open for students, scholars, analysts, and policymakers. There is no registration fee, but attendees are responsible for their own travel and lodging. Registration will open in summer 2019.